Home > News > Colleagues Say Judge in Dakota Pipeline Case Is Even-Handed

Colleagues Say Judge in Dakota Pipeline Case Is Even-Handed

February 12, 2017

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) – The federal judge who will decide whether oil flows through the disputed Dakota Access pipeline has shown sympathy for the historical plight of American Indians. Former colleagues say that won’t affect his decision in a lawsuit opposing the project.

U.S. District Judge James “Jeb” Boasberg is overseeing the suit filed by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux that could be their last hope of stopping the $3.8 billion pipeline to carry North Dakota oil to Illinois. The tribes argue the pipeline threatens drinking water and cultural sites.

Boasberg says he’ll hear arguments during a Monday status hearing that was already scheduled in the legal battle over the $3.8 billion pipeline to carry North Dakota oil to the Patoka Oil Tank Farm in northern Marion County.

The Cheyenne River Sioux has asked Boasberg to stop the work while a lawsuit filed earlier by the tribe and the Standing Rock Sioux proceeds.

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe also has vowed to fight the construction in court.

Virginia attorney Tim Heaphy worked with Boasberg when they were federal prosecutors. He says the judge “is not motivated by ideology or politics.”

Energy Transfer Partners got the needed permission from the Army on Wednesday night to lay pipe under a Missouri River reservoir in North Dakota. Work started immediately on the last chunk of construction.

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